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Letter from the President

“Somehow, we have to get older people back close to growing children if we are to restore a sense of community, acquire knowledge of the past, and provide a sense of the future.”

—Margaret Mead

The world’s population is rapidly aging. It is estimated that nearly 58 million people around the globe will turn 60 this year. Read More

Keeping Caregivers Connected

With the popularity of apps, it was only a matter of time before the Institute joined the technology revolution. Institute on Aging, in partnership with CareZone, is revolutionizing the way we take care of our loved ones.

Get the app here: http://app.lk/ioaging

Read More

Local Student Receives National Recognition for the Institute’s Art Program

Though he’s only 15 years old, Bay Area native Duncan McDonell is already making a name for himself in the world of inter-generational art programming.  Read More

Bridging the Digital Divide: Aging 2.0

Institute on Aging recently partnered with Aging 2.0, an organization committed to driving the next generation of technology innovation geared towards seniors. Read More

Sharing Songs with Seniors

The Institute’s 27th annual “Sharing Songs with Seniors,” a beloved holiday fundraiser, took place on December 8th, 2013. Read More

Dining Through the Decades:

Dinner à la Heart

More than three decades ago, Dinner à la Heart began with a group of pioneering women committed to the charitable mission of Mt. Zion Hospital’s older adult programs –helping seniors to age in place. Read More

Thank You! to our 2013 donors for the generous support.

Click here for a listing.

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“Somehow, we have to get older people back close to growing children if we are to restore a sense of community, acquire knowledge of the past, and provide a sense of the future.”

—Margaret Mead

The world’s population is rapidly aging. It is estimated that nearly 58 million people around the globe will turn 60 this year. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, in California alone, more than 1,000 Californians will turn 65 each day for the next 15 years. Concurrently, for the first time in recorded history, by 2050 there will be more seniors than children under the age of 15. In response to this unprecedented demographic change of fewer young people and a growing aging population, Institute on Aging is working to unite the generations through innovative technology and inter-generational programming.

By building relationships we not only connect different generations; we strengthen our community’s ability to respond to the increasing demands of lengthening lifespans. As a community connector, Institute on Aging focuses on creating opportunities for meaningful engagement between the generations - thereby creating positive and lasting change in the Bay Area.

Watch this short video and see how we help seniors stay independent and well. Click here

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With the popularity of apps, it was only a matter of time before the Institute joined the technology revolution. Institute on Aging, in partnership with CareZone, is revolutionizing the way we take care of our loved ones. If you’re an adult child caring for an aging parent or young adult with disabilities, a free mobile app, from Institute on aging will help you stay organized, facilitate your ability to coordinate with family and caregivers, and hopefully make your days a little bit simpler. And who couldn’t use that? Our new mobile app allows family members to check appointments and manage the health of their loved ones at the touch of their fingers. Wherever you go, you can securely access all that must-have information — social security numbers, medication dosages, important contacts, and more. Connections are central to everything that we do at Institute on Aging, in fact, we even went so far as to develop an app for that!

“The vast majority of caregivers in the US, 83%, are unpaid persons--usually family members—who are often stretched thin between their own busy lives involving work and kids and being the primary responsible person for mom or dad”, says Tom Briody, President and CEO of Institute on Aging.

“While agencies like ours can provide excellent community-based interventions to support people living independently at home, we cannot accomplish it without the support of our seniors’ families. This situation is only going to become more pronounced as the population ages rapidly. Here in the Bay Area, we’re poised to see a 67% increase in the over-85 population by 2030.” Remaining true to our mission of making it possible for seniors to live with dignity and independence in the community, Institute on Aging is committed to developing programs and partnerships that support family caregivers.

Get the app here: http://app.lk/ioaging

Local Student Receives Natio2014-Duncan-and-Patricia-051.jpgnal Recognition for the Institute’s Art Program

Though he’s only 15 years old, Bay Area native Duncan McDonell is already making a name for himself in the world of inter-generational art programming. Inspired by his involvement with Institute on Aging’s Center for Elders and Youth Arts program, Duncan applied for the 2014 Generations United Youth Jumpstart grant sponsored by the AARP Foundation and was one of only 20 grantees selected nationwide.

Duncan started volunteering at the Institute on Aging in the summer of 2013 as he was entering his sophomore year at Stuart Hall High School. Duncan began working with Institute Arts Program Manager, Jessica McCracken, at the Institute’s Ruth Ann Rosenberg Social Day Club in a card-making project revolving around the idea of “what makes us happy.” This experience inspired Duncan to become an advocate for providing artistic enrichment to seniors. As he likes to say, “Art is my passion and I believe that every person can express themselves through art … regardless of their physical or mental condition.” So it’s not surprising that when the opportunity presented itself to pursue a grant based on his experience at the Institute and the transformative power of art, applying was a no-brainer.

Duncan is one of a small group of youth that is aiming to change the way millennials view and treat older adults. As Jessica puts it, “He quite simply wants to make people happy and wants to share his joy for art with others. Our program is designed to enable youths like Duncan to take a leadership role and inspire his peers to find those things that they believe in--and then translate that belief into action.”

This grant serves as a wonderful opportunity for Duncan to lead visual art classes and train his peers about the satisfaction that arises out of working with older adults. A special thanks goes to Duncan and Generations United for pursuing this opportunity to continue to unite the generations through a shared love of art and storytelling.

Bridging the Digital Divide: Aging 2.0tom-at-conf.jpg

Institute on Aging recently partnered with Aging 2.0, an organization committed to driving the next generation of technology innovation geared towards seniors. This group of budding young entrepreneurs is headquartered at Institute on Aging’s Senior Campus, where they are working to develop consumer tech for aging Baby Boomers. Institute on Aging, along with Aging 2.0, is on the cutting edge of a growing movement to generate technologies that create greater efficiencies for older adults.

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The Institute’s 27th annual “Sharing Songs with Seniors,” a beloved holiday fundraiser, took place on December 8th, 2013. Over 300 people of all ages joined together to bring connection, goodwill, and holiday cheer to isolated older adults in both residential and nursing home facilities. Proceeds from the event directly support the year-round efforts of Institute on Aging.

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Dinner à la Heart

More than three decades ago, Dinner à la Heart began with a group of pioneering women committed to the charitable mission of Mt. Zion Hospital’s older adult programs –helping seniors to age in place. One of those women happened to be my mom. Like all the other members of the Ladies Auxiliary, my mom was a worker bee: making calls, securing reservations and creating the foundation for what would eventually become Institute on Aging’s single largest fundraising event.

When I started attending Dinner à la Heart, I didn’t know much about the event, other than it was dear to my mother’s heart. For the next 13 years, I would gather a group of my closest friends, choose a restaurant, and happily support my mother’s cause. When my mother passed away in the early 90s, it was Roean Iscoff who took me under her wing and taught me everything I know. Although my mom was no longer around to show me the ropes, thanks to Roean, I picked up right where my mother left off—answering the phones, making reservations and dining for a good cause—the Institute. Thirty one years since my mother and the rest of the ladies began this event, the tradition lives on, one generation to the next. We’ve moved from typewriters to personal computers, and there have been many changes over the years since Dinner à la Heart was launched. But the heart of the event remains the same: dining out to promote the dignity of aging in place.